Hello From Hilton Head Island

Good Morning, Everyone.

I want to start off by thanking Natalie the Explorer for taking up the mantle in keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running. Check out her blog that features discoveries of her home in and around Ontario, Canada and abroad, as well as her inspiring fitness adventures. 

If we were having coffee, I would announce that I am hailing from Hilton Head Island’s shores. Once again, my husband and I rented a condo for a few months to avoid the Northeast winter and, more importantly, spend quality time with the grandkids. It is a cozy apartment that is a short stroll away from an incredible park for playground and bike ride adventures, stores, and restaurants (featuring outdoor dining and take out). The ocean is a block away. This week, I found my rhythm by getting some writing in, picking up and playing with my granddaughter from school, and prepping dinners during the week. I’m also back to snapping sunrise pictures over the ocean and walking on the beach in the morning. The sand is so firm. I finally ventured on a substantial morning bike ride (I brought my own bicycle from home). Exhilarating! 

The big advantage of being close to the kids is that I get to do those necessary Nonny things, like host a sleepover. My grandaughter, Lily, is a little anxious sleeping over anyone’s house without a parent, so we improvised last night and had a “No Boys Allowed” sleepover with her mommy and myself. Her daddy and baby brother had their own sleepover antics at their house.

Our night had the required elements: French braiding hair, watching a movie (Mulan), eating popcorn. Surprisingly, Lily woke early with me and walked to the beach to see the sunrise. The clouds were heavy and gray so it wasn’t much of a a color spectacle. “Next time,” assured Lily. We had to get back to cook the traditional Junk Food Pancakes, complete with sprinkles and M&Ms (breakfast of sugar-high champions). Junk Food Pancakes was my dad’s specialty when his grandkids slept over.

If we were having coffee, I would admit that I really need to knuckle down and get Book 2 written. This week, I found myself falling into those research rabbit holes, which is part of the fun in writing historical fiction but significantly slows the process. I think I have a working title: Sluggers and Singers. What do you think? I also joined a local writers group, Island Writers Network, via Zoom, for writer-ly camaraderie. It looks like a very active and prolific group!

If we were having coffee together, I would report that my mom made it safe and sound to her Florida condo with her cat, Paris. Although lonely without my dad, my brother’s family and sister are nearby her and several of my mom’s cousins. It is a little odd to me that I haven’t seen Mom in over a week. I’ll be able to visit soon. For a while now, my sisters and brother, daughters, and nieces and nephews greet each other in the morning via text messaging with Mom. It’s a busy Good Morning thread. 

If we were having coffee together, I would recognize that the country is in a scary place. What an abominable crisis! I pray that we can find a means to heal wounds fast. 

If we were having coffee together, I would close by hoping that all of my peeps out there are keeping safe (you know how to do it). Patience and kindness are in order.

Thank you, again, to Natalie the Explorer. 

Have a good week, Everyone. Make it Funtastic!

If you had purchased a paperback or ebook Daily Bread and/or Becoming America’s Food StoriesThank you!

Take a picture of you with Daily Bread and/or Becoming America’s Food Stories, and I’ll send you Reader’s Swag and add you to the Becoming America’s Stories Readers slideshow, coming soon! Kid pics are welcomed with parent or guardian permission. Don’t forget to leave a rating and quick comment on Amazon and/or Goodreads.

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Stories Served News and Nosh

January 2021

WHEW! What a year!! 2020 proved to challenge, tax, and fray at all of us. It will take a good amount of patience, time, and kindness toward each other as we recover. I spent most of December addressing family needs and preparing for a very different holiday season. Carving out time and attention to writing Book 2 of the Becoming America’s Stories series and sharing musings had been difficult. I shared fantastic reviews for Daily Bread and Becoming America’s Food Stories and reminisced about my home town, Sayville. Here are the links to December’s Stories Served Around The Table Blog Postings.

Another Generous Review

Tenement Museum Book Talk

Writing Adventures

Shaking Off

Main Street, Sayville

Smorgasbord Children’s Cafe and Bookstore Christmas Book Fair

Becoming America’s Food Stories-A Review 

Presently, I am on Hilton Head Island until the end of February (and maybe a few weeks into March). My daughter and her family (that includes the grandkids) live here. My husband and I are renting a condo apartment nearby them and a block away from the ocean-my kind of heaven. I hope to get in a lot of beach walks, bike rides, cookie bakes, silly games, and writing done.

As I write this update, Sunday sauce is cooking in the crockpot, and drawers and cabinets look pretty well organized. I can immerse myself into stories and allow the kids and beach to interrupt me later on today.

2021 is looking hopeful. I hope all is as well as can be in your world and that you, too, are making plans to create a healthy and beautiful year with yourself and those you love (and like). 

Attention Teachers, Librarians, PTO Arts Chairpersons

I am offering virtual and (limited) live Meet-the-Author and Writers’ Workshops for upper elementary and middle school students. You can browse my classes here. I am also registered in the BOCES Arts in Education program (type MARTIN in the author search) and with Kids Out and About.

Big thank yous go out to Eclectic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Be well, my friends.
          Be safe.

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Becoming America’s Food Stories – A Review

Thank you, Donna,for such a thoughtful review. And I am so tickled you cooked and enjoyed one of the recipes!

Retirement Reflections

‘Becoming America’s Food Stories’ is part family memoir, part immigration story and part cookbook. Undoubtedly, it will make you reflect upon your own family, culture and food traditions — whatever they are. It is also guaranteed to make you hungry! With recipes ranging from simple pasta dishes and breakfasts to more complicated baked goods (at least more complicated for me), there is something in this book for everyone.

A quick and easy read, I finished my copy in just over an hour. I savoured the author’s treasure trove of warm family memories and swore that I could smell pasta sauce simmering in my kitchen.

As there was no sauce to be found, I decided to make the book’s Lentil Stew. It was an excellent choice. Thick, comforting and incredibly flavourful, both my husband and I greedily reached for seconds. Now, I need to decide what to make next. It’s a…

View original post 43 more words

Smorgasbord Children’s Cafe and Bookstore – Christmas Book Fair – New Author – #Historical – Daily Bread (Becoming America’s Stories, #1) by Antoinette Truglio Martin

Once again, thank you to Sally Cronin and her wonderful crew for reviewing Daily Bread. I am humbled by all of the heartfelt feedback. Happy Christmas to all!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delighted to welcome Antoinette Truglio Martin to the Children’s Cafe with her recently released historical story Daily Bread (Becoming America’s Stories, #1). This is book one in a series of three with the other two due to be published in 2021.

About the book

It is 1911. Crammed into a three-room flat in a Mott Street tenement, the large Taglia family needs all the help they can muster. Spunky songbird Lily wants to help by baking Daily Bread at the bakery like big sister, Margaret. But Margaret says Lily is just a little kid, and there is more to baking Daily Bread than height and an artist’s heart. Lily learns to navigate in a grown-up world when facing bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and treacherous streets to cross by herself.

One of the recent reviews for the book

View original post 342 more words

Main Street, Sayville

There is nothing more welcoming than a Main Street, USA decked in its holiday garb. Tinseled banners hang across the streets, decorated storefronts model how my table or mantle can look, twinkling lights and tinkling bells, the hub-bub of neighbors and the slower than usual traffic complete the magical scene. My hometown, Sayville, is a cozy hamlet on Long Island. The Great South Bay borders the south shore, and the Long Island Railroad runs through the middle transporting commuters to and from New York City. Restaurants, shops, and shoppers line the sidewalks that hug the two-lane street. Main Street Sayville reeks with Americana charm.

Spring awakens to colorful blooms on the trees and flower displays. Summer on Main Street is vibrant, with a long list of community activities and music spilling from open-air restaurants. Occasionally, you can hear the distant rev of a ferry engine, promising safe and fun passage across the bay to Fire Island. Rich harvest aromas waft from strolling coffee drinkers as shoppers admire the Halloween window paintings, courtesy of the Sayville High School art students. The year culminates with traditional holiday decor, music, and activities. A parade, concerts, gingerbread house contests, sidewalk sales, and the bustle of holiday shopping fill December’s calendar.

When I was a kid, my sisters, friends, and I walked or rode our bikes into town. There were always friends to meet up with, things to browse at, and something to try on. I bought jeans at the Cargo Shop, stationary at Grieve’s, and something in the chocolate family at Francis’ Sweet Shop. I marched in the holiday parade with the Sayville High School marching band, and later with my daughter’s Brownie and Girl Scout Troops. During the holidays, Main Street, Sayville confirmed the magic of the season. Sayville was a great town to grow up in—it still is.

Stores and restaurants still line Main Street, Sayville. Most of the management and many names have changed over these last 50 years, although Sayville Pizza is in the same place and Fritzsche’s Bakery sports its familiar yellow sign.

During this year’s holiday season, tinsel, lights, and wreaths welcome visitors along Main Street Sayville and down Railroad Avenue. The donated evergreen tree and menorah light up each night at Sparrow Park. It appears to be the usual festive Main Street Sayville I have always known.

Like all American Main Streets, COVID-19 has reduced and restricted 2020’s holiday traditions and activities. Traffic thinned. The holiday activities and events were abbreviated or canceled. It has been hard to recognize neighbors with masks covering smiling faces (but, thank you for wearing a mask!).

I recently strolled through Main Street Sayville, searching for gift ideas, but mostly admiring the window dressings and nod to strangers as we keep our distances. I bought a hot coffee at Starbucks, noted a few ideas from the Catbird Seat, and slipped into Sayville Chocolatier for my husband’s after-dinner treat who is recovering from knee replacement surgery. The Thornhill’s Pharmacy space has a new store—Sayville-n-Spice. I met the exuberant proprietor, Matthew LaPiana, who showed me his impressive collection of spices and sauces, and talked about his vision for his business and how he can be part of the Sayville scene.

Sayville-n-Spice is a delightful shop. I was happy to see the familiar floor tile from the old pharmacy and the iconic neon Thornhill sign hanging above the header. There is a galore of gift ideas. I bought a small sample of cinnamon and chili BBQ rub to add to a different meatloaf I was concocting that night and made a note that I would be back to fulfill a gift list.

Main Street, Sayville is open for business. It is the perfect place to find treats, gifts, and a little magic.

winter holiday tinsel and lights

Wishing my Everyone a festive holiday and a new year filled with hope, love, and FUN!

If you had purchased a paperback or ebook Daily BreadThank you!

Take a picture of you with Daily Bread, and I’ll send you Reader’s Swag and add you to the Daily Bread Reader slideshow, coming for the New Year. Kid pics are welcomed with parent or guardian permission. Don’t forget to leave a rating and quick comment on Amazon and/or Goodreads.

Big thank yous go out to Eclectic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Shaking Off Coffee Share

Good Morning, Everyone.

It’s a gray raw morning here on Sayville Long Island. Snow is in the forecast…uhh. 

The coffee is hot. Grab your mug. Let’s quickly catch up.

If we were having coffee together, I would invite you to view the Tenement Museum Book Talk event. I had a wonderful chat with Erika Sullivan and responded to Zoom participant questions. It was a comfortable and easy-going hour. I’d do it again! Thank you to everyone who viewed and commented.  

If we were having coffee together, I would proudly announce that the Jr. Bookworms Book Club is available for viewing on Between the Covers YouTube channel. Seven middle-grade students joined Stephanie Larkin, publisher of Red Penguin Books, and me for a lively and insightful chat about Daily Bread. The kids were great. Take a look.

If we were having coffee together, I would add that Daily Bread received 5 star reviews from Readers’ Favorite. Not only were the words wonderful, I am entitled to a flashy sticker to place on the book cover. WhooHoo!

 

If we were having coffee together, I would admit that I am struggling to get into the holiday mood. Like everyone else, parties, gatherings, and drop-in visiting are non-existent. But then another blow unraveled this week. My youngest daughter Robyn, who lives in Oregon, and my middle daughter, who lives in Hilton Head Island, SC, with her family that includes the grandkids, will not travel due to, you know, #!*@ing COVID. Missing my dad adds to the melancholy. 

This crazy year forces us to adapt. Today, I am going to the grocery store to stock up on baking supplies and take a walk through my beautiful downtown Sayville. Instead of cooking Sunday dinner tonight, I’m flooding the house with Christmas baking. Baking is not my strong skill set, but the aromas and comfort should help offset the sadness. My eldest daughter, Sara, will visit tomorrow for my hubby’s birthday. We will Zoom with the faraway children, decorate the tree, and sing Happy Birthday. It will have to do. 

If we were having coffee together, I would say that my husband and I are renting the same condo on Hilton Head Island for two months (maybe longer).   Once we get COVID results, we are driving south soon after Christmas. We will be nearby the kids and able to walk the beach daily. 2021 is looking up. 

Be well, Everyone.  

Big thank yous go out to Eclectic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

If you had purchased a paperback or ebook Daily BreadThank you!

Take a picture of you with Daily Bread, and I’ll send you Reader’s Swag and add you to the Daily Bread Reader slideshow, coming for the New Year. Kid pics are welcomed with parent or guardian permission. Don’t forget to leave a rating and quick comment on Amazon and/or Goodreads.

Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Be well. Be safe.  

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Writing Adventures Coffee Share

Good morning, Everyone.

There is a brisk chill in the air here on the south shore of Long Island. Winter is not far away. Get yourself a hot cup of coffee. Let’s catch up.

If we were having coffee together, I would tell you the week was cluttered. It started with nausea and the fear that I may have contracted The Bug, but after standing on the Urgent Care line for an hour and a half outdoors with my back to the wind, the happy diagnosis was a typical stomach bug; WHEW! This gave me the go-ahead to rest for a day, then pick up with helping my mom with all kinds of home business affairs, take care of the husband as he recovers from knee replacement surgery (the scar is unbelievably unnoticeable, and he is walking about nicely and can drive!), schedule needed appointments, start on Christmas card and calendar designing, and get back to writing.  

If we were having coffee together, I would update you on the writing front. Although Becoming America’s Food Stories is out, the paperback version is having technical problems with delivery. I ordered two retail copies, but the big order to distribute to reviewers and my contributors is still in process. The eBook is instant. The special Black Friday $1.99 price will stand for another week or so. Daily Bread eBook version will remain at 99 cents for a bit as well. 

Daily Bread has been on an upward ride this week. I had an amazing Jr. Bookworm Book Club Zoom event with Stephanie Larkin, publisher of Red Penguin Books, and seven middle-grade students from two neighboring school districts. The kids were fantastic, and Stephanie was a terrific host. I was so impressed with kids’ insight and thoughtful commentary. We had an excellent discussion for an hour and a half. I can’t wait to share it on YouTube! 

Thanks to Sally Cronin and Debby Gies, Daily Bread was included in the Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Children’s Cafe and Bookstore Christmas Book Fair. What makes this so exciting is that the Smorgasbord Blog Magazine hails from England, so now Daily Bread has an international presence!   

If we were having coffee together, I would report that I got to go on a field trip to New York City Lower East Side armed with a list of questions, a camera, mask, and umbrella. I am researching Lillian Wald and the Henry Street Settlement House for Book 2 in the Becoming America’s Stories Series. I needed to visit the house. Group tours are not available yet due to the pandemic, but I did score a private tour with a knowledgeable young woman, Katie Vogel. She took me through the house, which was fascinating. Although updated for community activities, the archives, photographs, beautiful crown moldings brought out the essence of this historic landmark. Briefly, Lillian Wald founded the settlement house with help from progressive philanthropists. She began the visiting home nursing service, pushed for nurses and nutrition programs in schools, instituted community clinics, provided a place for labor and social activism to meet, and was a strong voice for peace, women’s suffrage, and addressing the needs of the poor. Henry Street Settlement House will play a part in my story characters’ lives.

 Anyway, I had to forgo my usual train travel into the city and drove (thank God for GPS). After circling the blocks for parking, I surrendered to a garage. I had a wonderful visit. Seeing and walking through the house gave me a firsthand feel as to how people gathered and interacted inside and outside this historic landmark. 

After the tour, I walked to Orchard Street to drop off Daily Bread and Becoming America’s Food Stories to the Tenement Museum ( a 10-minute walk). I am scheduled for the live Book Talk on December 8th at 7:00 PM EST (here is the link.).  The bookstore and select tours are opened on a limited schedule.

From the Tenement Museum, I walked to Mott Street, where my story character, Lily Taglia, lived in 1911. It is no longer a sprawling Little Italy neighborhood as a bustling Chinatown is now occupying the shops and apartments. There is so much to do and see! Rain threatened. I needed to experience the walk from the fictional home on Mott Street to the real Henry Street Settlement House. I had walked around this neighborhood last year to see where the bakery could have been located, school and church. I love research.  

As I walked, I imagined the children in my story running through the street, cutting through shortcuts in the park (Seward Park and the Seward Park NY Public Library was in existence in 1911) and finding a respite for play at the Henry Street Settlement House. The walk was a little over a mile, doable for kids in those times. I made it back to the parking garage just as the skies opened up to the forecasted rain. I managed to navigate out of the city and onto the parkway that led me home, with a treasure trove of information and experiences playing out in my head. Now I have to write the story. 

Today, as the story mulls in my imagination, I have to take care of errands, pull Christmas decorations out of the attic, visit Mom, and attempt to get some cleaning chores done. First, feed the cat and pour another cup of coffee. 

If you had purchased a paperback or ebook Daily BreadThank you!

Take a picture of you with Daily Bread, and I’ll send you Reader’s Swag and add you to the Daily Bread Reader slideshow, coming for the New Year. Kid pics are welcomed with parent or guardian permission. Don’t forget to leave a rating and quick comment on Amazon and/or Goodreads.

Big thank yous go out to Eclectic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Be well. Be safe.  

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Tenement Museum Book Talk

Join me at the Tenement Museum Virtual Book Talk on YouTube Live for a Daily Bread chat on December 8th, 2020 7:00-8:00 pm EST. I will be joined in conversation by Erika Sullivan, the Tenement Museum’s Advance Sales Associate and aspiring Young Adult Librarian.

Here is the lead:

In 1911, Manhattan’s Lower East Side swelled with immigrants and stories of struggle while vying for the American dream. Daily Bread is one such story, following the life of nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants. Lily learns that “it is not easy to be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhood, skirting old-world traditions, tackling bigotry, disasters, dotty bakers, and crossing busy streets by herself”. Inspired by the stories her grandmother, aunts, and mother told around the dinner table, Antoinette Martin weaves an imaginative tale. She will read a passage from the historical novel and talk about the cookbook that is published in tandem.

While this program is free, you can donate to support future programming from the Tenement Museum here

When: December 8, 2020, 7:00 – 8:00 pm ET

Where: https://youtu.be/ay8hslpVe24

This program will continue to be available on our Youtube channel following the LIVE screening.

Hope to see you then.

(SO Excited!!)

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Hope you are hungry. Becoming America’s Food Stories recalls the tales that have been told around my family’s dinner table. The histories explain the motivations over bowls of macaroni, antics play out while slurping soup, and laughter echoes throughout the dining room. Pull up a seat. There’s always room.

“If you don’t cook with love, you have to get out of the kitchen.” Florence Messina

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Another Generous Review

 Maria Antonia, writer, artist, teacher, and middle grade book reviewer shared her lovely review of Daily Bread. You can read all about it here.

Thank You! Thank You!!  

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

A Thankful Thanksgiving Coffee Share

Good morning, Everyone.

 The day has not dawned yet. I am writing in my unheated sunroom without a blanket over me. It will be a warmer than expected day here on the south shore of Long Island. I am up early to meet my sisters for a Sunday brunch at Mom’s house. I’m bringing the bagels. Pour yourself a cup of coffee. Let’s catch up.

If we were having coffee together, I would tell you that Thanksgiving was a success. The tent rental had sides to keep the morning rain out and the wind from blowing everything into the next yard. Everyone could distance themselves, remain outside while we counted our blessings, and enjoyed the day together. Everyone brought something to the table. Of course, there was too much to eat. Matt barbequed the turkey, his specialty, mostly sitting down with his leg raised. The new knee is recovering very well. 

Throughout the day, some tears mingled with lots of laughter. Those of us who needed to be together on this thankful day were able to reminisce as we navigated the COVID challenges and break in new traditions. We had and have so much to be grateful for. Dad’s spirit was with us.

If we were having coffee together, I would report that Becoming America’s Food Stories is out in the world in paperback and eBook formats. You can take advantage of Black Friday Cyber Monday long weekend and order Becoming America’s Food Stories eBook for $1.99 at Amazon. Daily  Bread eBook is also on sale for 99¢. If any of you foodies or story lovers out in blog land is interested in reviewing Becoming America’s Food Stories, please contact me for more specials. 

If we were having coffee together, I would remind you that December 8th is the virtual Book Talk at the Tenement Museum. Still so excited! Here is the link

I would also remind you of the first Daily Bread Jr. Bookworm Book Talk will be recorded on Monday—that’s tomorrow! Seven children will Zoom in for a lively discussion. It should be a lot of fun.  Stay tuned for the recorded link.  

If you had purchased a paperback or ebook Daily BreadThank you!

Take a picture of you with Daily Bread, and I’ll send you Reader’s Swag and add you to the Daily Bread Reader slideshow. Kid pics are welcomed with parent or guardian permission. Please email me for details. Don’t forget to leave a rating and quick comment on Amazon and/or Goodreads.

The day is dawning. I need to start the day and get the bagels, cream cheese, and maybe some lox. 

Big thank yous go out to Eclectic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Be well. Be safe.  

_________________________________________

Daily Bread is set in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, 1911. The story follows nine-year-old Lily, an American-born child of Sicilian immigrants, who wants to prove she is not a little kid. To be a big kid in the crowded tenement neighborhoods, she must tackle bigotry, bullies, disasters, dotty bakers, and learn to cross the street by herself.

Amazon Red Penguin Books

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.
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