BIG Announcement

Hi Everyone,

 BIG news. EXCITING news! OMG, this is happening news!!

Red Penguin Books offered me a contract to traditionally publish my middle-grade historical novel, Daily Bread! They will manage the editing, layout, design, and artwork, and have it out in the world by (gulp) October, complete with generous promotional, distribution, and multimedia programs. 

Take a breath. There is more.

 Stephanie Larkin of Red Penguin Books believes the best way to sell a book is to write and put out the next one and offer a companion to pique readers’ interests. She wants a series, which is great since the sequels have been playing in my head for quite some time now. We discussed the companion and concluded a collection of recipes from my Italian-American grandparents with accompanying short background stories would be amazing.

The timeline is a bit aggressive, but I work best under a tight deadline. Here’s the rundown: 

 October 2020: Daily Bread launches

 November 2020: The cookbook comes out (do you see the opportunity to offer a gift set for the holidays?)

 May 2021: Book 2

 November 2021: Book 3

As bonus features, I will have book club questions and curriculum connections available for all three novels and recipe previews for the cookbook. I have to suspend my other writing projects until I can breathe, but will continue to post the weekly coffee shares and be available for in-person and virtual  author school visits in the schools (email me at storiesserved@gmail.com for details and schedules).

I feel very good about Stephanie Larkin and Red Penguin Books. They have been accessible, transparent, and willing to share a bevy of publishing business expertise. Putting quality books in the hands of readers is the mission. It’s my desire, as well. We are on the same page. 

Join me on this incredible ride. Stay tuned.

Clinking Glasses on Google Android 8.0 Saluti Everyone!

 

 


A quick reminder to enter the $40 Amazon Gift Card Raffle. Even if you are a loyal follower, you can sign up to be in it to win it! Click HERE. 

 

 

 

 

 


Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Why Write?

I aim to write in my notebook each morning. Coffee freshly dripped from a K-Cup, cools beside me. My cat, Hershey, has learned to sit on my left side so I can scratch his ears while I scribble. The sun porch overlooking my tidy backyard is my favorite writing place. If the room is too hot or cold, I’ll settle into the big comfy chair with a pillow

A beach in the living room

behind my back and the view of a fourteen-foot mural of the Fire Island Pines shore. If I can’t be at the beach, I can at least have a life-size beach view in my living room, even if there is a lamp in the foreground. It is a cozy scene. I am grateful for my quiet muses and comforts.

What do I write? Small sensory observations, gratitude for all the blessings, and gripes born from disappointments and general WTF moments fill my pages. Sometimes I simply list must-do tasks and scheme want-to-do plans.

Why am I writing? I’ve always written. I think of myself as a creative person. I don’t draw or paint, sing well enough beyond an octave range, nor have grace or athletic talent. Writing is the one outlet that expresses me. Essays, stories, poems (terrible ones) tell who I am, where I come from, what is going on in my head. Most of my writing never goes beyond my journal pages. Through writing, I can play with word choice and sentence structures, rehearse what I need to say, and decide what is not worth saying. Daily writing gives me my voice.

Why do you write?

Be well. Be Safe. Be Smart.
Register to vote

 

 

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

 

 

In Praise of Tomatoes

Good morning, Everyone. A clear summer day is ahead with cooler temperatures and sort-of lesser humidity. Let’s chat over a cup of coffee.
I am sitting in an ancient Adirondack chair that has been part of our homes’ patio decor for, what… decades? It is wooden with some patches of lichen, comfortable, and amazingly sturdy. I am facing the perennial garden that unfortunately took a beating from the almost hurricane (but it was really a tropical storm) Isaias. The vegetable garden took a hit as well. All but the peppers look weary. The okra stands spindly, the eggplants are dwarfed, and the tomatoes hang from wounded vines. I am mostly sad over the tomatoes. Thankfully, my sister-in-law, whose yard is behind ours, has an abundant crop.
A treasured gift of August is the tomatoes. Garden tomatoes taste like a tomato and lend their flavor to just about any dish. Store-bought tomatoes, even those with organic labels on healthy-looking vines, lack the delicate texture and always disappoint with its cardboard aftertaste finish.
Tomatoes have taken center stage in the farm stand displays. Just about each vegetable stand at the Sayville Farmers Market at the Islip Grange has glorious orbs of tomatoes. You can’t miss them. Now that tomatoes are in its zenith, I can eat them all day.
I have been sauteing tomato slices to fold into breakfast omelets. Thick tomato slices are alternated with mozzarella cheese and drizzled with a rendered fig balsamic glaze. With a dollop of fresh basil pesto added, my mid-morning or afternoon snack is satisfied.
A garden tomato sandwich with a smear of mayo or honey-mustard completes lunch. A grilled tomato and cheese sandwich is Matt’s favorites. When I cut tomatoes into wedges, add sliced red onion and chopped basil and parsley, and mix with oil and vinegar, a salad is born.
Sliced tomatoes in a fried eggplant stack (I’ll have to post an ode to eggplant soon) or topping a grill portobello mushroom completes dinner.

photo by ATM

I have exalted the praises of tomato pie in previous posts. The beauty of this pie is that it can be eaten cold or hot. There are many recipes, but I will humbly state, with conviction, that my tomato pie is THE best.

photo by Matt Martin

For my birthday in October, Matt picks the largest tomatoes to stuff with lobster, celery, and mayonnaise—his version of a carb-free lobster roll, and yes, it is THE best.
In between snacks and meals are the tomatoes dried in the dehydrator then frozen in a reusable snack baggie. I call it Tomato Candy. It is great on top of a salad, too.
Now that I need a coffee refill, I wonder if there is such a thing as tomato as a tomato infused brew. Hmm.
Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.
Big thank yous go out to Ecelic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Be well. Be safe. Be smart

Register to VOTE!

A quick reminder to enter the $40 Amazon Gift Card Raffle. Even if you are a loyal follower, you can sign up to be in it to win it! Click HERE.
Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Coffee in the Rain

Good morning, Everyone.

The rain is falling in a gentle patter this morning. We need the rain, and I’m thankful the wind has finally laid down from yesterday’s northeast bluster.  Dangling tree limbs threatened landfall from last week’s almost hurricane.  The tree guy is coming soon. The temperature dropped from sweltering to reasonable yesterday afternoon allowing us to relinquished the air-conditioned atmosphere and open the windows. 

If we were having coffee together, I would tell you my husband, Matt, and I were on our Beach Week vacation last week reconnecting with friends at the best place on Earth, Davis Park Fire Island. However, it was a different Beach Week. Only my eldest daughter, Sara, was able to join us for a day trip. My parents, recovering from cardiac episodes and keeping socially distance missed out, and our usual posse also practiced social distancing on the boardwalks and sandy shorelines.Tropical storm Isaias blew in, howled through the sassafras and chokecherry trees and whipped the ocean and bay into a whitecap frenzy spraying saltwater beyond the dune lines and bulkheads. Beautiful drama. Our little community fared with minimal damage, and the electricity quickly rebounded. It took two days for the ocean to calm down so that we could swim safely and resume sun-worshipping rituals.

If we were having coffee together, I would report that the mainland was not so lucky. Salt spray and high winds damaged lawns and browned summer colors. Many were without power for a week or more. When we returned home last Sunday, the electricity was on, but our tomatoes were severely wind-blown, and branches and heavy tree limbs littered the yard—ergo the need for the tree guy. Although, no significant home damage, it took me the better part of two days to clear the lawn. 

If we were having coffee together, I would announce that I have re-dug into writing projects since returning from the beach. I completed the BOCES Arts in Education application for virtual and in-person school author visits and am halfway through the online course on learning how to teach online.  My Journal On! A Teacher’s Journaling Practice Workshop will be offered remotely through the Western Hamptons Teacher Center.  Once it is all up, I will share the links.

School is opening in a variety of fashions on Long Island and New York City, but it is all dependent upon balancing and implementing safety precautions and minimizing infection rates. Everyone is rightly nervous and concerned for our children, teachers, and communities. 

If we were having coffee together, I would announce that I have two book events this week. I will be at the Smithtown Rotary Club on August 19th and on a virtual author panel sponsored by the Sayville Library on August 20th at 7 pm. 

I also set up a $40 Amazon gift certificate raffle to commemorate Hug Everyone You Know’s 3-year Publication Anniversary.  This will hopefully boost book sales and Stories Served email listings.  Click here to sign up! Everyone is welcomed.

I am exploring cover design options for Daily Bread. Although I did a fair job on Canva designing Journal On! covers, Daily Bread needs a professional illustrator. Suggestions?

If we were having coffee together, I would offer one more bit of news. I joined my cousin’s letter-writing campaign to get out the vote for the 2020 election. I feel some involvement is better than passively fretting and complaining. No matter how your politics steer your conscious, voting is every American’s right and civic duty.  

Well, the rain has stepped up to a steady shower now. I should close some windows a little bit and refill my coffee. Thanks for reading and listening.

Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Big thank yous go out to Ecelic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Be well. Be safe. Be smart

Register to vote.

                     

 

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

Stories Served News and Notes August 13, 2020

I am writing while thunder and flashes of lightning usher in the dawn. The storm will pass through soon leaving a fresh wash from the humidity (I hope). In the meantime the low rumble and steady patter of rain provide perfect morning music. 

I just came home after a week at my favorite place—Davis Park, a Fire Island beach community. The beach is the place to revive and create memories with family and friends. Read about the origins of my beach obsessions in   The Beach Loving Legacy of Nelly Truglio  

Stories Served Events: 

*August 19th, 12:00 pm Rotary Club in Smithtown                                

I will be live (properly masked and distant) talking about Hug Everyone You Know and writing with perseverance.

*August 20th, 7 pm Sayville Library virtual presentation The Author’s Journey Towards Being Published. 

I will be on a panel talking about Hug Everyone You Know along with Theresa Dodaro, author of The Tin Box Trilogy, and Valerie Nifora, author of I Asked the Wind. This program uses Zoom online. To sign up for this program, go to https://bit.ly/2DtbF88. You will be emailed an access link the day before the program.

Reminders

I am available for in-person and remote Zoom style book club meetings. Personally signed Hug Everyone You Know books are available for a reduced price. Click here!

Attention TEACHERS

I have several school writing workshops for grades 1-8. You can read about them HERE. Contact me to set up dates and request further details. 

Also stay tuned for my professional development on-line course Journal On! A Teacher’s Journaling Practice.   

That’s it!
Be well. Be Safe. Be Smart.
Register to vote

 

 

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

 

 

The Beach Loving Legacy of Nelly Truglio

This painting portrays Coney Island, 1889. Coney Island was and is Brooklyn’s seaside mecca. The beach offered relief from the city’s heat and congestion. From the way people dressed, it is hard to imagine any measurable bits of relief. Hats, shoes, high neck collars and long sleeves could not invite more than a stroll while sweating. I feel a bit of sadness for their restrictions. The clothing and social taboos restrict the joys of the sun, sand, and surf. Imagine the scolding the children had to endure for damp hems and gritty stockings.
My great-grandma, Nelly Truglio, loved being around the water. Aunt Tosca, her youngest child, remembers traveling on the BMT with her mother and older brother Alfred to Coney Island in the 1930s. By then, there was a boardwalk, ice cream, and hot dog stands, rides, and attractions. But the Truglio trio was there for the beach and ocean. They went just about every summer day, even if the weather was not beach perfect. The children played in the sand and swam in the surf while their mother stood guard cooling in the wash of the waves.
Great Grandma must have believed the beach as the best playground for her children and herself, a woman who actively sought out joy in her every day. Aunt Tosca said, “Mama packed towels, a blanket, lunch, and an umbrella. We left home right after breakfast and got a spot near the water so we could keep an eye on our stuff. Mama didn’t swim but enjoyed every minute being in the water and watching us play and swim. She wore a modest swimsuit and always carried an umbrella over her head because she did not want to get tan. After our morning swim, we ate lunch on the blanket. Mama made us lay down and rest so as not to get a cramp when swimming in the afternoon. Later in the day, we’d pack up and buy a frozen custard before riding the subway back home.” Aunt Tosca holds these images as her most cherished childhood memories.
During the forties and into the early fifties, my mother took the same BMT train to Coney Island with her girlfriends to spend the day sitting on sandy towels and cooling in the ocean. My dad was fortunate to have a summer home, The Country House, in Copiague on Long Island. He, his sisters, and cousins swam the canal and paddled or puttered a small boat into the low tide beaches of the Great South Bay to fish, clam, and play. Just like Great Grandma and her children, they all came home sunkissed and happy.
The beach and sunseeker legacy continued through my generation. My childhood home was in Sayville on the Great South Bay. Like my dad, I clammed, fished, and played on the bay. Instead of the subway taking me to the ocean shore, I rode my bicycle to Port O’Call to catch the ferry to Barrett Beach on Fire Island. Like my mom, I met friends and swam in the surf all day. I would eat the salami sandwich I brought for lunch and buy an ice cream cone before returning home on the ferry.
When my daughters were little, I’d pack them and the beach paraphernalia I could carry and ride the ferry to Barret during the weekdays. The fares were cheap, and I could not juggle the kids and operate our boat without my husband. Like Great Grandma, the days did not have to be beach perfect. Overcast and wild winds on the ocean were just as glorious. My girls had to rest for thirty minutes after eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches before going back to the surf, just like Aunt Tosca, Uncle Al, my dad, and his posse and me and my crew of siblings and cousins did as kids. As a responsible adult, I realized this rule enabled the parents to sit down and relax before resuming the surf watch on the water’s edge.
Although 800 miles down the coast, my grandchildren have honed their beach-loving legacy and bloomed into proper beach-bums. My daughter and son-in-law carry on the belief the shore is the best playground for their children. Great Grandma would have been proud.
These days, the ocean and bay remain part of my backyard. Fire Island is a boat ride or a ferry excursion across the bay. The beach is my place to appreciate, slow down, and just be. I find relief from my pressing anxieties and believe, like my great-grandma, that this is the best playground for my family and myself.

This essay is dedicated to my Great Grandmother, Angelina “Nelly” Truglio. Her birthday is today, August 7th. I do not remember her well, but I do remember her broad smile, jolly laugh, and bright floral housedresses. Aunt Tosca honors her mama’s memory by retelling the happiness and love her mother created out of simple pleasures and grace.

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

July 2020 Recap

Welcome

to Stories Served Around The Table July 2020 Recap. The pandemic remains the topic of conversation. Everywhere, everyone must wear masks and keep a distance while going to and from essential errands. Recognizing neighbors in masks has become a skill set. I still find it hard to greet with a head nod, and elbow tapping friends is not satisfying.

I am sorry to report that there is only one blog posting for July.

An Absent Note

I needed to take a blog hiatus to tackle foundations for writing projects and wrestle with personal exigencies and clutter. The big crisis occurred when my dad’s tender heart stopped and needed emergency attention and repair. Scary. Horribly scary. Investigating, processing, and coordinating with doctors, my sisters, and Mom took juggling mastery. Communication was especially tricky with COVID-19 and visiting constraints. Thankfully, positive energies, medical science and expertise, family’s resources, Dad’s resolve, and Mom’s insistence that he was not allowed to leave just yet pulled Everyone through. Dad is doing well—very well, where it is difficult for him to “take it easy” (his normal state).

My other little personal fires have settled into manageable camps. I am back from my hiatus, ready to focus.

Here are the highlights

*Journal On! A Writer’s Daily Workbook is in editing. It’ll be a companion to Journal On! A Writer’s Daily Workshops for children of all ages.

*My application to BOCES Arts-in-Education as a visiting author in the schools is coming along. I will be offering several Stories Served Workshops for elementary to middle school students and teachers. You can click here to view my information flyer.  Contact me for remote and in-person options.

*I am enrolled in Creating Online Classes and Blended Learning through the Teacher’s Center of the Western Hamptons. Learning to teach online is essential for these times.

*Stephanie Larkin’s, of Red Penguin BooksMarketing Your Book-Level 1 course completed. Wow! This class was chock-full of non-scary step-by-step strategies I can actually do.

*Editing continues on Daily Bread. My beta-readers were so essential in pulling this story together. Heartfelt thanks go out to my parents, who provided the Sicilian dialect and manners’ nuances and details. Marie Yervasi, Westhampton Beach Children’s Librarian and Programmer offered insightful comments and suggestions.

*Thank you, My Everyone, for helping me decide on the Stories Served logo. Just about all votes led to this final choice.

* I’ll be back with weekly coffee shares and other writerly postings next week.

*Stay tuned for freebie giveaways coming up in August.

Upcoming Events

*August 20th, 7 pm Sayville Library virtual presentation The Author’s Journey Towards Being Publish.

I will be on a panel talking about Hug Everyone You Know along with Theresa Dodaro, author of The Tin Box Trilogy, and Valerie Nifora, author of I Asked the Wind. This program uses Zoom online. To sign up for this program, go to https://bit.ly/2DtbF88. You will be emailed an access link the day before the program.

*August 19th, 12:00 pm Rotary Club in Smithtown 

I will be live (properly masked and distant) talking about Hug Everyone You Know and perseverance with writing.

That’s it!
Be well. Be Safe. Be Smart.
Register to vote

 

 

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

 

 

An Absent Note

Please excuse Antoinette from the blog and commenting responsibilities over these last few weeks. She will be back in mid-August.

Antoinette needs to step back, re-plan the blog and website, spend time taking care of family matters, and focus-focus-focus on several writing projects that need her attention and juggling expertise. She also hopes to get some beach time and sailing in as well.

Antoinette wishes her Everyone well.

Be safe. Be smart. Register to vote and be informed.

Sign,

Antoinette’s Practical Persona

 

 

 

Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

 

 

June 2020 Recap

Welcome to Stories Served Around The Table June 2020 Recap. Summer is bursting out all over. The foxgloves and hydrangeas took over the side yard, the raised beds hold a bounty of vegetable promises, and the catboat launched (rigging awaits). Schools in my area officially closed remote learning classes for the summer. Graduation parades and drive-in style ceremonies mark the milestones. My home on Long Island is beginning to return from COVID-19 restrictions. A few hiccups have popped up, but overall the slow, careful reopening looks hopeful. Check out the June blog postings. I started to post Daily Bread features that include recipes, historical issues, and my writing process. I hope you like it. Please share to spread the joy. I would love to know your impressions.

A New Beginning in a New World
June 2020 Coffee Share 
Working for the Dream 
A Tiger in the Yard 
Writing Protagonist Right

During the COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders, I polished and produced Journal On! Thoughts Gleaned While Quarantined for teachers to present thematic journaling prompts to their students. I hope that the exercises inspire joy and a daily journaling habit. There is a small stash to give away to teachers and parents who are looking for writing resources. I only asked for a $2 fee to cover the mailing cost and honest comments and suggestions. A free PDF version is also available. If interested, please email me at storiesserved@mail.com.

Journal On! A to Z Writing Prompts is another work in progress. I plan to offer this theme as a school workshop by September. Once the regional BOCES Arts in Education program opens, I can register as a visiting author, but at this point, one must be flexible. I may have to develop that virtual presence after all.

In other writing news, beta readers are reviewing Daily Bread. I included my parents. Although it is not a good idea to rely on close family members for literary critique, my folks caught inaccuracies and clarity points from the Sicilian translations and terminologies appropriate for the time—a priceless resource. The more objective readers are coming back with glowing feedback, so the book is on the right path. No luck, however, in capturing an agent’s attention.

I continue to fuss with a logo for Stories Served Around the Table. Here are the top two.

 

I could use some feedback. What do you think? Thank you, My Everyone, for indulging me. Please feel free to comment (kindly) and share to Your Everyone.

That’s it! Thanks for reading and listening. Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Big thank yous go out to Ecelic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Be well. Be safe.

Register to vote.

                     
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Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

 

 

Writing Protagonist Right Coffee Share

Good morning, Everyone. It’s a beautiful day in my neighborhood. Lots of stuff going on which I will get to later, but this week I have been plagued with a writer’s dilemma. Grab your coffee. I am going to prattle through. 

Now that my novel, Daily Bread, is complete, an issue concerning the age-based categorization nags. The publishing world for children’s work dictates general guidelines to identify the readership market. There are four major categories—picture books, chapter books, middle-grade, and young adult (YA). These categories can fall into fiction and non-fiction realms and carry the recognizable genres, such as fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction.

The content and delivery of the story determine the readability and target audience. Picture books drive the story with illustrations and can be read aloud, ushering the love for language and reading. Chapter books invite fledgling readers to independently tackle books as they develop comprehension, imagery skills, and deepen appreciation for books. Middle-grade novels invite more complicated social and emotional stakes. Readers experience the beginnings of personal autonomy within their immediate world and family circle. Chapter book protagonists are usually eight or nine years old, and middle-grade readers expect their heroes to be eleven or twelve years old. Unlike YA, there is no profanity or romantic plots that go beyond a middle-grade crush and first kiss. YA novels contain the nitty-gritty of teens fitting into a grown-up world.

Categorizing Daily Bread along the readership guidelines has vexed me. Daily Bread unfolds through the eyes of Lily Taglia, a nine-year-old girl living in the Little Italy tenement neighborhood on Mott Street in 1911. She straddles between little girl safety and restrictions and big kid responsibilities and status. Although Lily is almost as tall as her twelve-year-old sister, Margaret, she is defined as a child because of her playful spirit and innocence.

I wrote this middle-grade novel with the younger protagonist instead of Margaret’s because Lily’s emergence from a little kid to a big kid was more authentic for the era. I am responsible for keeping facts real despite the fictional narrative. Immigrant children of the early 20th century were burdened with adult responsibilities and experiences before they were emotionally and physically ready. Lily held onto secrets that piled up, suddenly noticed hardships and conflicts that threatened home, and eventually took on responsibilities that turned out to be harder than they looked. Margaret was already a master of chores and wise in the way of their world that earned her parents’ confidence and trust. Margaret’s growth and transitions added to the story, but Lily’s journey was much more dramatic. The proverbial doors opened, and light bulbs lit as Lily learned to navigate and accept big kid responsibilities in a great big world.

Daily Bread’s social, historical, and emotional themes may be too complicated for chapter book readers. Originally I wrote Lily as an eight-years-old but recently gave her an added year to appease the protagonist guidelines for middle-grade readers. I wrote it in third person rather than first, giving me the avenues to create a more obtuse world for the characters with sensory details an eight/nine-year-old may miss. I believe this provided middle-grade readers a rich reading experience despite the hero’s tender age. It is also giving me space to continue Lily’s and her friends’ stories since the series, The Mott Street Kids, continue to play out in my head and live in outlines on paper. I like my little hero. She deserves her story, and readers deserve to know her.

I’d appreciate any comments and suggestions from fellow readers and writers.

That’s it! Thanks for reading and listening. Have a good week, Everyone. Make it great.

Big thank yous go out to Ecelic Ali for keeping the Weekend Coffee Share up and running.

Be well. Be safe.

Register to vote.  

 


Antoinette Truglio Martin is the author of Hug Everyone You Know: A Year of Community, Courage, and Cancer. The memoir is a wimpy patient’s journey through her first year of breast cancer treatment.

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